Cyre was a human kingdom in the southeast of the continent of Khorvaire, and formerly one of the Five Nations of the kingdom of Galifar. Once, it was described as the brightest and most beautiful of the Five Nations and called Beautiful Cyre, Wondrous Cyre, the Jewel of Galifar, and even the Purple Jewel of Galifar's Crown. But it suffered and was dragged low during the Last War, before the entire realm was destroyed by a cataclysmic event known as the Mourning. Now, it is known as the Mournland.[6][1][2][7][3][8] At its height, Cyre once included parts of what are now Valenar and Darguun.[9][10][11][12] It is the homeland of the displaced Cyran peoples.[13]

Before the War, Cyre was renowned for its cultural achievements in artifice, artistry, jewelry, music, philosophy, and oratory, and for representing the best of Galifar.[3][8] It was a peaceful realm[13] even a paradise to many in the Kingdom of Galifar, described as a place where arcane dreams were made manifest. However, its detractors decried it as a realm of arrogance and decadence.[1] Either way, it was considered the most beautiful and artistically developed of any of the Five Nations, known for its artistic traditions, elegance, and style[2] and as a monument to the magical and artistic accomplishments of the Kingdom of Galifar. It had great centers of learning and state-of-the-art development in the fields of magic, artifice, and architecture.[8]

Population[edit | edit source]

According to the census of 992 YK, Cyre had a population of 1,500,000 people.[1] The majority of Cyrans were humans, half-elves, and halflings, with some changelings and shifters also represented.[2]

Cyran humans are generally gracile, with slender builds and long limbs. They are known for an innate and easy grace, as well as a poise and elegance that humans of other nations admire. Most have wavy dark hair, though a few are born with pure white hair, which is traditionally linked to magic. Customarily, white-haired young Cyrans are encouraged to practice magic, and many seem to have a knack for it. Cyrans favor hair cut to a medium length and left loose to shift freely as the move.[14]

The warforged were first created in Cyre.[15]

Culture[edit | edit source]

What our dreams imagine,
our hands create.
— National Motto of Cyre[1]

Cyran culture values diversity, flexibility, and versatility in all areas of life, from skills to mindsets. Cyrans consider themselves to incorporate elements of culture from all over Khorvaire.[3] The Cyrans prefer to enjoy life and the fruits of their work,[1] and even after the obliteration of their nation, Cyrans avoid melancholy and hold to a forward-thinking and unique culture.[16]

The "Cyran appreciation" is central to Cyran culture and outlook. This is a philosophy, even a lifestyle, centered around appreciating beauty and magic and encouraging innovative and unconventional practices, not just in art but in life as a whole. Once, this was a virtue, impressive and wondrous to all the Five Nations, but during the War propaganda and nasty rumor painted it as indulgence and excess. In turn, under the darkness of war, some Cyran nobles engaged in darker pursuits, leading to the reputation for decadence, even immorality, and vile habits. After the War, the survivors struggle to keep up the Cyran appreciation, and it leads to misunderstandings among their host nations.[1]

The Cyrans have a tradition of artisanry that dates back centuries[13] Thanks to this, Cyre had a reputation for fine arts and crafts and for quality manufactured items. Rich folk across the Five Nations pride themselves in owning pieces by Cyran master artists.[6] Cyre employed many bards and minor wizards, and the dragonmarked houses, to construct a wondrous realm exhibiting light and grace.[14]

Cyre was the cultural center of the Five Nations[17] being the perennial birthplace of new trends and styles that spread across the continent, in the fields of art, music, fashion, and more,[1] though after the Mourning their art has understandably become somewhat darker.[16] The Cyrans love to change, experiment, and advance their art, pushing boundaries and shocking others with how far they'll go to do it.[1][14] Just about every Cyran knows a form of artistic expression: drawing, painting, singing, sculpting, or magic—it does not matter which. But in particular every Cyran knows how to dance the tago, learning it when young and becoming adept at it in social occasions over the course of their lives. It is considered the birthright of every Cyran.[14]

A bard from Cyre.

Traditional Cyran fashion is similar to Aundairian fashion, but focuses more on the bright colors and less on flamboyance in hats and ruffles.[2][3] Glamerweave is especially favored.[3] It varies widely in cut and style, yet often features long flowing parts, typically wide sleeves and short cloaks; Cyrans enjoy attire that billows and ripples with the slightest breeze. However, the most common and obvious attire is gloves. Almost every Cyran owns and wears a pair of gloves, whether short and sturdy for work and combat or longer, finely made and decorated for formal occasions. Cyrans rarely revealed their hands; a handshake from an ungloved Cyran hand is a show of great trust.[14] However, Cyrans also enjoy jewelry to a degree many think is vulgar;[2][14] they acquire whatever pieces they can afford, preferably loose dangling bracelets, earrings, and necklaces, and especially with small bells or colorful feathers. The grandest items are the complex headdresses that extend from the brow and across the head and down to the shoulders and even far down the back. In fact, Cyrans are so well dressed that formal occasions are not discernible by clothing but by greater use of jewelry, as well as masks. Costumes were the rule at balls and festivals.[14] After the War, while some Cyrans hold rebelliously to their old fashions, others adopt the attire of their new homes to make do or blend in.[2][3] Nevertheless, their fashions are chic and daring still. The latest, common among the young, is "mourningwear" or "Mourning wear", which is dark or black but flamboyant in the standard Cyran cut and intended to remember a country they barely knew.[16][3]

However, the Last War saw the once beautiful Cyre become a battlefield as it faced enemies on all sides. Its people and culture suffered and many of its great works were lost, even before the Mourning destroyed them utterly.[6][1] As it shrank, its outer settlements were often left razed while the cities were populated with refugees and poor and homeless folk, their beauty fading.[2][7] Arguably, Cyre suffered the greatest of all the Five Nations.[7]

Like most of Khorvaire, worship of the Sovereign Host was the majority religion in Cyre,[2][3] although a significant minority followed the Silver Flame.[3] However, the Cyrans were not especially religious and only infrequent worshipers of the Host.[14] After the Mourning, many struggle with their faith, or hold even more closely to it through their ordeals.[3]

Cyran wizards are known for their illusions.[18] Cyran magic ranges from the practical to the extravagant.[14]

Society[edit | edit source]

Cyran adventurers are often artificers, fighters, wizards, and clerics of the Sovereign Host, and may even become archmages, eldritch knights, hierophants, loremasters, and master inquisitives.[13]

They are often skilled in diplomacy, the healing arts, and crafting items of various kinds.[13]

Monarchy[edit | edit source]

Under Galifar's system of succession, Cyre was ruled by one of the children of the current king. Over the centuries, a tradition formed that the governor-prince of Cyre was the child that would become the next king or queen of Galifar.[3]

After being governor-prince of the state of Cyre in 858 YK, Mishann ir'Wynarn declared herself Queen at the outbreak of the Last War in 894 YK, but maintained her claim to Galifar. She reigned until 908 YK.[16]

She was succeeded by Brusst ir'Wynarn, who reigned from 908 YK to 913 YK.[16]

Brusst was succeeded by Connos ir'Wynarn, who reigned from 914 YK to 942 YK.[16]

Connos was succeeded by Queen Dannel ir'Wynarn, who reigned from 943 YK. She was the last ruler of Cyre and was slain in the Mourning in 994 YK.[16][2]

A portrait of Prince Oargev ir'Wynarn, the last scion of Cyre.

The only surviving scion of Cyre's monarchy is her son, Prince Oargev ir'Wynarn, who was ambassador to Breland at the time of the Mourning. By default, he is now the king-in-exile, though the kingdom is no more, and governs the survivors at New Cyre.[19][20][21][3] Other, lower-ranked members of the royal family also may survive.[21][note 1]

The monarchs of Cyre traditionally wore the Cyran regalia.[22][23] They reigned from the royal palaces of Vermishard in the capital city of Metrol.[24][25][2][26]

The heraldic symbol of Cyre was a crown and a bell above a hammer and bellows, on a field of green.[1]

Armed Forces[edit | edit source]

Known armed forces of Cyre were:

It even fielded warforged-only regiments to help fight.[28]

The Cyran military made heavy use of warforged, but found it impractical to have an artificer with every unit to repair them. Thus, they developed the oil of repair to restore them to full working condition.[29]

Cyre's fleets were stationed in Kraken Bay, its only coastline.[30] Steel krakens, manufactured in the same creation forges as the warforged titans, were deployed in Kraken Bay to defend the southern shore.[31]

Dragonmarked Houses[edit | edit source]

House Cannith's ancestral estates were located in Cyre,[19][32][14] with its base of operations in the city of Eston, a mining town,[7][24][2][3] and facilities at Whitehearth and Rose Quarry.[26][33] Workshops, mines, foundries, and forges operated by Cannith were scattered across Cyre.[28][3][8] These were constructed both on and within mountains, in subterranean mazes, and suspended over canyons.[8] Cannith had its own areas of jurisdiction in Cyre and beyond.[34] Their only genesis forge was in Cyre.[35]

House Phiarlan also had its original family enclave and headquarters in Making in Cyre, with its Demesne of Shadow in Cyre's capital, Metrol. Phiarlan's Entertainers and Artisans Guild was credited with fueling much of Cyre's creative energy.[6][7][36][37]

House Vadalis was also active in Cyre. They engaged in questionable practices at Clifftop.[12][22]

Economy[edit | edit source]

When part of the Kingdom of Galifar, Cyre was the richest of the Five Nations.[8]

In Cyre's system of currency, the silver throne is valued at 5 sp. It remains in circulation around Khorvaire even after the Mourning.[38]

History[edit | edit source]

Age of Monsters[edit | edit source]

Like much of southwestern Khorvaire, Cyre holds a number of ruins dating back to the Dhakaani Empire. These were extensively excavated by scholars prior to the Mourning.[39]

Pre-Galifar[edit | edit source]

Circa −1500 YK, the first settlements that would grow into the Five Nations were made in central Khorvaire. Around this time, the Mark of Making first manifested in the humans of the land that would become Cyre,[5][40] among the artisans and itinerant tinkers. The dragonmarked Clan Cannith emerged here, growing into House Cannith.[19][32][34]

In his campaign to conquer the Five Nations circa −1000 YK, Karrn the Conqueror drove the defeated goblinoids out of Karrnath into the wild south, but his true purpose was to invade the land that would be Cyre. Surprised, it was quickly taken and added to his empire.[5][41]

Under Galifar[edit | edit source]

A map of the Five Nations of the Kingdom of Galifar around 500 YK.

At this time, the land was a realm of its own, known as Metrol, and one of the Five Nations.[41][12] Then King Galifar I and his sons and daughters came and united the Five Nations by conquest to form the Kingdom of Galifar in the year 1 YK. In recognition of their services, the sons and daughters of Galifar were each granted control of one of the Five Nations as governor-princes; the youngest son Cyre took Metrol and the southeast.[5][40][41] Cyre and the other nations existed in close alliance under Galifar.[12]

In 32 YK, the Five Nations were renamed for their rulers; Cyre's domain of Metrol became Cyre.[5][41] In 40 YK, Cyre succeeded his father as king of Galifar.[5][40]

In 858 YK, Mishann ir'Wynarn, eldest scion of King Jarot ir'Wynarn, became the governor-prince of Cyre. She succeeded her uncle, Jarot's brother, after learning the skills of the position from him.[16]

The Last War[edit | edit source]

After King Jarot's death in 894 YK, Mishann should have, by all rights and traditions, assumed the throne, but she was prevented from doing so by her ambitious siblings. When they met at Thronehold for the funeral and intended coronation, Thalin of Thrane rejected Mishann's claim and the whole concept of primogeniture, as did Kaius of Karrnath and Wroann of Breland. Furthermore, Thalin and Wroann each declared they should rule and marshalled their vassals. Mishann was initially supported by her brother Wrogar of Aundair, but this was not enough to decide the issue, and the scions departed Thronehold. Within the year, this conflict over who should inherit the throne of Galifar ignited the Last War, with Cyre and Aundair facing off against Breland, Karrnath and Thrane, before even these alliances collapsed.[1][4][5][2][7][42][43] That year, Mishann declared Cyre a sovereign nation, as did the other four.[1]

Over the next century, alliances would be made and broken and betrayed by all of the Five Nations,[42] though Aundair usually supported Cyre.[44] But sitting at the heart of Khorvaire, Cyre was surrounded by foes, fighting battles on every front at various times[7] and becoming the main battleground of the Last War. Cyre faced the armies of Breland, Karrnath and Thrane, as well as Lhazaar pirates and Talenta tribes, and later Darguun and Valenar.[1] Battles between Cyre and Karrnath seemed the bloodiest of the War.[45]

The first extended campaign of the Last War was the siege of Eston in 895 YK.[46]

At the outset of the Last War, Cyre was quickly pressed on all sides and seemed at risk of imminent defeat to the alliance of Breland, Karrnath, and Thrane, and therefore sought allies wherever it could.[1][9] Under pressure, around 900 YK, Cyre turned to mercenaries to supplement its armies. However, this strategy ultimately wound up costing Cyre dearly.[9][10] To Cyre and Breland both (but mostly Cyre), House Deneith provided goblinoid mercenaries from the Seawall Mountains, their numbers rising until tens of thousands were stationed along the Cyre–Breland border.[10][11][47] Cyre also hired Deneith's Blademarks Guild directly; one Cyran general was angered when blademarks under his command refused to attack an enemy garrison also guarded by Deneith forces, attacked them, and was routed by their combined forces.[48] With deft negotiation, Cyre's rulers also hired elf mercenaries from the Valaes Tairn of Aerenal and let them within their kingdom, where they made their camps at the southernmost tip. They seemed resolute in their loyalty and desire solely for gold and military glory. Through the War, the elves operated as cavalry and commandos and would fight Brelish and Karrnathi forces, hobgoblin mercenaries, and Talenta halfling warbands.[1][9][49][50] Their battles against Karrnath would be the most vicious of the War.[45] Thus bolstered, Cyre stood firm while its enemies turned on each other, and Cyre survived and succeeded more than its size and power would've suggested.[1]

Some nationalists who mourned the collapse of Galifar and declined to fight in the War looked to build a new kingdom outside it. In 928 YK, King Connos of Cyre gave Duke Ven ir'Kesslan permission to settle the land of Q'barra beyond the Endworld Mountains. Thousands of colonists protected by Cyran military sailed off and settled Adderport.[5][51][52]

Cyran forces besieged Korth, capital of Karrnath, in 936 YK.[53]

Meanwhile, House Cannith had focused on developing various constructs that functioned as soldiers, siege engines, and other war machines. Their first creations were barely sentient golems, which were deployed in battle on the Cyran side in the late 930s YK, but they were hard to control in the field. But better versions like the warforged titans were developed over the following two decades.[54]

Then, after half a century of fighting for Cyre, in 956 YK, the elves under Shaeras Vadallia annexed the entire southeastern part of the country for themselves, claiming it had formerly been an elf land on the basis of an ancient trading colony there. They went on to create the nation of Valenar.[9][1][5][12][40][49][50] While some claim the then queen of Cyre had insulted Vadallia, it was more likely the desire for a greater challenge that drove him.[49]

With this loss of land and allies, Cyre seemed doomed, until[1] the modern warforged was perfected by House Cannith in 965 YK[5] and first sent into battle that year.[54]

Then, in 969 YK, a hobgoblin mercenary chieftain named Haruuc united the goblinoids of the southwest and rebelled against Cyre and Breland. They killed hundreds of humans and enslaved others, while the rest escaped into the surrounding lands. This took Cyre and Breland utterly by surprise, and neither could muster forces to retake the land. Haruuc laid siege to Warden Keep until its 2000 defenders starved to death. Thus, Haruuc carved the new goblinoid nation of Darguun from the southwest of Cyre. While Breland made peace, Cyre continued fighting the goblinoids for the rest of the War.[10][5][11][12][40][47][55]

A warforged legion facing a Karrnathi battalion at Cyre's northern border.

But Cyre was able to hold its own thanks to its wealth. The warforged reinforced Cyre's armies and helped the kingdom stay strong despite the high cost of war.[1] Cyre went on to have one of the biggest warforged armies of the Five Nations.[15] But Cyre still needed weapons and warriors to give it an advantage and achieve military superiority, so it began pouring money into House Cannith's continued development of a much larger version of the warforged titan, known as a warforged colossus.[54]

Over 971973 YK, Cyran forces once again laid siege to Korth.[53]

However, as Cyre's fortunes ran out late in the War, it struggled to sustain its war efforts and was beset on all sides by warring nations. Cyre was pressed hard, with battlefields across the north and west and the enemy advancing ever closer to Metrol and the largely untouched south. Queen Dannel's leadership kept Cyran spirits and morale high nonetheless.[1]

Then, at the beginning of 994 YK, Cannith unveiled the warforged colossus, the biggest and mightiest warforged yet. The colossi were first deployed in 994 YK, without delay the first was sent north to defend Metrol from the Karrnathi. They left a path of destruction behind them, but laid waste to armies before them. However, the Mourning occurred before they could be used to their full potential.[54]

Near the end of the War, great battles were being fought on Cyran soil that threatened to finally overwhelm Cyre for good, though the people were still ready to defend their homeland with lives.[7] Cyre made a push for Atur in Karrnath, and Karrnath launched a counterattack in the north.[22][8] On 17 Olarune, in the Battle of Arjon Ford, a Thrane company in Cyran territory was ambushed by Karrnathi, who were attacked in turn by Cyran soldiers and warforged. The Karrnathi were defeated, and the slain Thranes buried in a mass grave (they would rise again as undead mourners).[56][57] At the time, Cyre was negotiating a peace with the Valenar elves, with nobles of the ir'Thavar family meeting with Vadallia at Taer Valaestas.[58]

The Day of Mourning[edit | edit source]

On 20 Olarune in 994 YK, Karrnathi forces seized Cyran land in the north, preparing to use it as staging ground for an invasion of Breland.[45] That same day, the last major battle of the Last War, though it was not known at the time, was fought in southwestern Cyre. Cyre's Western Army fought the allied forces of Breland (gnomes and humans led by the warforged Bastion, who arrived weeks earlier) and Thrane, together with mercenaries of Darguun (fighting in the area for the last year), Valenar, and Zilargo, with tens of thousands of soldiers in all, in a massive and messy pitched running battle along the Saerun Road in the kingdom's southwest. Yet the Cyrans held their line. It was a decisive battle for the kingdom, but it was to be shockingly curtailed.[25][59][2][26][8][46]

Without warning, the entire nation of Cyre was wiped out in a magical catastrophe known only as the Mourning. The causes of this event are unknown, whether accidental or deliberate, whether an enemy assault or a Cyran project gone awry, and accounts of what actually happened that day vary. But it is known that a cataclysmic blast of magical energy engulfed the whole kingdom with a rolling wall of mist and anything caught within it was killed or transformed, while the very land or Cyre was reshaped into strange new forms behind it. By the end of what was later dubbed the Day of Mourning, Cyre as a nation was gone. All that was left was the Mournland.[6][1][5][24][59][2][7][12][40][60][61][8] The final battle was left eerily preserved in the Field of Ruins, while the great Glowing Chasm opened up in the north and the enormous Glass Plateau rose in the south,[25][59][2][26] and the old kingdom's last borders were marked by the dead-gray mist.[59][8]

Over a million Cyrans were slain, the majority of the population and nearly all those in central Cyre, while hundreds of thousands managed to flee the destruction.[62][12][63][8] Queen Dannel herself was lost and presumed slain.[2][7][3] Some who lived close to the western border managed to flee in time and escaped into neighboring lands ahead of the dead-gray mist, such as farmers and merchants. Other survivors were those outside of Cyre's borders, such as soldiers in other lands, or those able to flee Cyre quickly through mundane or magical means.[62][63][61] The new nations of Darguun and Valenar were not affected.[citation needed]

The dragonmarked houses were also impacted. House Cannith lost its ancestral estates and its patriarch, leaving it disorganized and divided.[19][24][32][7] By a stroke of fortune, while House Phiarlan lost its headquarters in Cyre, all the house leaders were out of the country on the Day of Mourning, prompting rumors they had foreknowledge of the catastrophe.[6][7][36]

After the Mourning[edit | edit source]

Mirasandra ir'Thavar, a half-elf Cyran avenger.

On hearing of the Mourning, those Cyran forces surviving in Brelish and Karrnathi territory quickly surrendered.[60]

In the aftermath, taking pity upon the survivors, King Boranel of Breland welcomed them and let them form refugee camps within his kingdom's borders.[62][64][63] However, many of the camps were disorganized and filthy, spreading disease and furthering suffering. But the refugees kept gathering and the camps kept growing. Realizing they were inadequate,[64] Boranel gave permission for Prince Oargev, Cyre's last prince and ambassador to Breland, to establish a town and granted them the land and the authority to govern themselves.[64][65] The thankful Cyrans renamed the Brelish Camp as New Cyre.[64][1]

However, with more and more of the survivors coming every day, in 998 YK, the Brelish Parliament introduced legislation to put a cap on the population of New Cyre, as they did not want potentially 20,000 Cyran refugees inside their borders.[66]

Known Locations[edit | edit source]

The ruins of Metrol, the Rising City, capital of Cyre.

Cyre was once renowned for its beautiful and magnificent cities,[6] described as glittering[46] and graceful and filled with light.[14] The greatest of these was the capital, Metrol. All are now left in ruins in the Mournland[24][2] or are possessions of Valenar and Darguun.[9][67][68]

Mournland[edit | edit source]

Cities
EstonKalazartMakingMetrolTronish
Towns
Eastwood SpringsSeaside
Fortifications
Barren KeepFort Bright
Villages
Totens
Others
Arjon FordBroken TowerDollen on the RiverGreenlandJarpLornShaelas TiralethSwoz
Dragonmarked House Facilities
ClifftopWhitehearth
Roads & Lightning Rails
Mile-Mark StationSaerun Road

Darguun[edit | edit source]

Towns
LyrentonRhukaan Draal
Fortifications
Warden Keep
Dragonmarked House Facilities
Rose Quarry

Valenar[edit | edit source]

Cities
Mardain (Southport)

Geography[edit | edit source]

At its height, Cyre was a prosperous land with fertile farmlands and flourishing cities.[2] By 992 YK, the land of Cyre covered some 1,020,000 square miles (2,640,000 square kilometers). It had a temperate climate.[1] Apart from Eston, all the major cities and towns stood beside bodies of water.[25]

In the southwest of central Cyre were once rolling plains. This area is now just the Field of Ruins. Through here runs the Saerun Road, or what's left of it.[26] In the southeast near Kraken Bay are lush hills.[26]

The hills around Eston held rich mines that produced iron and adamantine used in the manufacture of warforged.[25][26]

The land that is now Darguun was once Cyre's southwestern borderlands,[10][12][55] specifically Darguun's northern plains.[10][11] The goblinoids dwelling in the lowlands have occupied and rebuilt former Cyran towns;[67][47] the capital, Rhukaan Draal, is based around the ruins of a Cyran frontier market town.[67][68] However, others remain razed and abandoned.[47][55]

The land that is now Valenar, meanwhile, was once Cyre's southeast,[9][69][12] though it was not a significant presence here.[70] It was a sparsely populated land of intermittent human villages, wandering halfling tribes, and hidden hobgoblin clans. Former Cyran cities remain here.[9][49]

The Cyre River marked the northern border with Karrnath. The Last War saw fighting up and down and on both sides of the Cyre River and in trenches across the north.[71]

The Talenta Plains were held to be part of Cyre when the kingdom of Galifar still stood. During the War, Cyre claimed parts of the Talenta Plains, though the halfling tribes held back invaders and avoided them entirely when the Five Nations fought there.[51][72]

The highest mountain in Cyre was Kenn Peak, with a height of 7,576 feet (2,309 meters).[1]

Geographical Locations[edit | edit source]

Bodies of Water
Kraken BayLake ArulLake CyreCyre RiverBrey RiverEmerald Gleam River
Mountains
Kenn Peak

Cyran Diaspora[edit | edit source]

Since the annihilation of Cyre in the Mourning, the surviving Cyrans are a dispossessed people who can be found living across Khorvaire, mainly among their former enemies in Aundair, Breland, Karrnath, and Thrane, as well as in the Mror Holds and Zilargo.[13] But as much sympathy as these nations profess, they don't want many, or even any, Cyrans to settle among them. Aundair refused entry to one wave of refugees.[73] Survivors have dispersed across Khorvaire, with some traveling as far as Stormreach in Xen'drik.[citation needed]

However, Breland willingly received a great many Cyran refugees, even granting them land to settle. In Breland, the Cyrans have founded the town of New Cyre, while others formed communities in Sharn, Wroat, Shavalant, and Ardev. But while most Brelish are tolerant and feel obligated to provide aid, a few factions maintain the antagonism of the War, have no liking or pity for the refugees, see the Mourning as punishment, and even want to complete the genocide.[74] New Cyre serves as a gathering place and beacon to all the dispossessed Cyrans.[62][66] Prince Oargev, son of Queen Dannel, rules New Cyre, home to the largest concentration of Cyran refugees.[citation needed]

Cyran refugees also live in Q'barra, in Hope and New Galifar, in the greatest number outside Breland. However, their arrival has triggered tensions with the various groups of settlers. However, these folk have refused Prince Oargev's call to New Cyre and chosen to commit to new lives in Q'barra.[51]

Cyrans still dwell in Valenar, once a part of Cyre before the elves annexed it. These farmers produce food for their elf rulers, and receive protection in return.[9][50]

Many of the survivors still harbor grudges against all the other Five Nations over the Last War and their treatment following the Day of Mourning. Many of the other nations turned away Cyran refugees or were concerned that Cyrans were a possible threat.[citation needed]

Appendix[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

According to Keith Baker, here, there is no one correct pronunciation of "Cyre". In 2019, he stated that "SEER", "SIGH-ur", "SEER-ee", and "KEER-ee" are all valid pronunciations, as is any other pronunciation the players use at the table. There is a great deal of regional variation in Khorvaire, and just about any possible pronunciation is used by someone somewhere on the continent.

Keith has also stated that pronunciation differs in the "three Cyres": the Mournland, the former Cyran territory now part of Valenar, and the former Cyran territory in what is now Darguun. The word is thus used as a shibboleth, a word whose pronunciation reveals an individual's ethnic or regional identity. However, the exact pronunciation for each region is not canonically defined.

Keith says that he personally uses the pronunciation of "SEER-ee", having picked up this pronunciation from Bill Slavicsek in 2009 or earlier. However, this causes a problem with Keith's iPhone, which interprets the word as invoking the app Siri. In 2017, he suggested that perhaps the people at the heart of Cyre pronounced it "SEER-ee", those in the south said "SEER", and people of other nations tended to use "SIRE". Yet another pronunciation is "KY-ree".

According to a chat with Keith Baker in 2010, the natives of Cyre pronounced it "kai-ree".

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Eberron Player's Guide page 23 says "Much of Cyre's ruling family was destroyed" and "The most powerful remaining member", both implying the survival of other members of the royal family.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 1.27 1.28 1.29 1.30 1.31 1.32 1.33 Five Nations, p. 77-78. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 Eberron Player's Guide, p. 5,8,129-131. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 109-110. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 136,142,176. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 225. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 9,188. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  7. 7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 7.06 7.07 7.08 7.09 7.10 7.11 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 5,89-90. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 218. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 14,210. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "ECS-p210" defined multiple times with different content
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 152,153,156. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Eberron Player's Guide, p. 133. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.8 12.9 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 12-14. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 25. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  14. 14.00 14.01 14.02 14.03 14.04 14.05 14.06 14.07 14.08 14.09 14.10 Five Nations, p. 80. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 21,22. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 Five Nations, p. 81. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  17. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 64. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  18. Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 107. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 148-149. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "ECS-p231" defined multiple times with different content
  20. Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 245. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Eberron Player's Guide, p. 23. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 96. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "ECG-p96" defined multiple times with different content
  23. Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 222. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 190. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 25.4 25.5 Five Nations, p. 83-84. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.3 26.4 26.5 26.6 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 91-93. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  27. Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 232. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  28. 28.0 28.1 Player's Guide to Eberron, p. 97. James Wyatt, Keith Baker, Luke Johnson, Steven Brown (2006). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3912-5.
  29. Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 271. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  30. Player's Guide to Eberron, p. 133. James Wyatt, Keith Baker, Luke Johnson, Steven Brown (2006). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3912-5.
  31. Five Nations, p. 93. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  32. 32.0 32.1 32.2 Eberron Player's Guide, p. 21. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  33. Shadows of the Last War, p. ?. Keith Baker (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3276-7.
  34. 34.0 34.1 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 210. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  35. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 47. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  36. 36.0 36.1 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 236. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  37. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 90,226. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  38. Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 7. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  39. Player's Guide to Eberron, p. 16. James Wyatt, Keith Baker, Luke Johnson, Steven Brown (2006). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3912-5.
  40. 40.0 40.1 40.2 40.3 40.4 40.5 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 37. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  41. 41.0 41.1 41.2 41.3 Five Nations, p. 8,10. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  42. 42.0 42.1 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 35. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  43. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 80. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  44. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 67. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 Five Nations, p. 96,98. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  46. 46.0 46.1 46.2 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 220. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 47.3 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 110. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  48. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 212. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  49. 49.0 49.1 49.2 49.3 Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 162-163,165. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  50. 50.0 50.1 50.2 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 129. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  51. 51.0 51.1 51.2 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 194. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "ECS-p194" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "ECS-p194" defined multiple times with different content
  52. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 149. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  53. 53.0 53.1 Five Nations, p. 109. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  54. 54.0 54.1 54.2 54.3 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 223,314. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  55. 55.0 55.1 55.2 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 110-111. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  56. Five Nations, p. 90-92. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  57. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 94. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  58. Five Nations, p. 89. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  59. 59.0 59.1 59.2 59.3 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 191. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  60. 60.0 60.1 Player's Guide to Eberron, p. 93. James Wyatt, Keith Baker, Luke Johnson, Steven Brown (2006). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3912-5.
  61. 61.0 61.1 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 12-14. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  62. 62.0 62.1 62.2 62.3 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 148-149. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  63. 63.0 63.1 63.2 Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 79. Keith Baker, Jeremy Crawford, & James Wyatt (2019). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0786966890.
  64. 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.3 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 76. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  65. Eberron Player's Guide, p. 126. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  66. 66.0 66.1 Five Nations, p. 54. Bill Slavicsek, David Noonan, and Christopher Perkins (2005). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3690-8.
  67. 67.0 67.1 67.2 Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 155. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  68. 68.0 68.1 Eberron Player's Guide, p. 134. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  69. Eberron Player's Guide, p. 146. David Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5100-1.
  70. Player's Guide to Eberron, p. 64. James Wyatt, Keith Baker, Luke Johnson, Steven Brown (2006). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3912-5.
  71. Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 38,182. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  72. Eberron Campaign Guide, p. 158-159. James Wyatt and Keith Baker (2009). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-5099-4.
  73. Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 141. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.
  74. Eberron Campaign Setting, p. 143,151. Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, & James Wyatt (2004). Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 0-7869-3274-0.

Further Reading[edit | edit source]

Connections[edit | edit source]

Cities of the Mournland
Eston · Making · Metrol · Seaside


Regions & Nations of Khorvaire
Aundair | Breland | Darguun | Demon Wastes | Droaam | The Eldeen Reaches | Karrnath | The Lhazaar Principalities | The Mournland | The Mror Holds | Q'Barra | The Shadow Marches | The Talenta Plains | Thrane | Valenar | Zilargo
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